Defaults lead to bail


The holidays are time for family.  The last thing you want to do is to spend your holiday in jail.  One of the most important factors in determining if the judge will set a bail on you is how often you default.  The purpose of bail is to encourage a person to show up in court.  Therefore, if you have a lot of defaults or fail to show up to court when you are supposed to, it is more likely that you will be held on bail. 

Just because you have a warrant on a case doesn’t mean that the judge will automatically set bail.  As not all warrants are created equal or viewed in the same way.  There are two types of warrants on cases.  First, there are default warrants.  A default is entered when a person fails to show up to court when they have notice of court date.  When a person defaults the court will send out a default warrant. 

The second type of warrant is known as a straight warrant.  In the situation of a straight warrant, the defendant has not gotten notice of the court date.  This usually happens because the court was unable to reach the defendant with a letter regarding his or her court date.  

Most if not all judges view straight warrants in a more favorable way than default warrants.  It really makes sense if you think about the differences.  The court assumes that you didn’t know your court date when it issues a straight warrant and assumes you did get notice when it issues a default warrant. 

Essentially, the court views that it is your fault for defaulting on a case and that will increase the likelihood of bail being set.  Verses in the situation where you have a straight warrant, the court assumes you didn’t know therefore it isn’t your fault for not showing up.  In the situation of a straight warrant, the court is less likely to place a bail on you just because you have a warrant. 

For more information: visit http://www.attorneychan.com or contact me at 508-808-8902

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Don’t turn yourself in


You get a letter in the mail; it states that you won free Red Sox tickets.  The letter gives you a place, date and time to redeem your tickets.  You show up and you are arrested because of an outstanding warrant.  You learn a very important lesson, don’t turn yourself in.  If you have an active warrant, a lucky day of winning tickets can get you into handcuffs.

Law enforcement has gotten better at tracking down people with warrants over the years.  If a person has an active warrant, the police are allowed to arrest the person when the see them.  During raids, car stops and searches police will look to see if a person has an active warrant that would require the person to be arrested.

In recent years, many police stations have decided to make their lives easier by getting people with warrants to turn themselves in.  The police departments will usually come up with a fake contest telling the person with the warrant to redeem their prize at a certain location.  When the person with the warrant shows up to redeem their prize, they are taking into custody. 

It is amazing the amount of people the police end up taking into custody through these fake contests.  If you have an active warrant and get a letter in the mail about winning a contest it is important not to try to redeem the prize.  If you do follow the instructions of the contests, the only prize you’ll get is a night in a jail cell.  

For more information: visit http://www.attorneychan.com or contact me at 508-808-8902

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Owing the court money or community service could land you in jail


People don’t like court.  Most people want to get their criminal cases done as soon as possible.  As a result, many people are not paying attention to the judge.  Unfortunately, the clerk will reduce into writing the judge’s orders onto the docket (court’s paperwork). 

 A lot of pleas end up in court fines or community service.  Usually, the judge will allow a certain amount of time for the court fines to be paid or community service to be completed.  If the money or community service is paid by a certain date, the defendant usually doesn’t need to show up to court.  However, if the money isn’t paid or community service isn’t completed, the person needs to show up to court to address the situation. 

 If a person fails to show up to court to address the failure to pay or completion of community service, a warrant will be issued for the person’s arrest.  To add to the person’s problems, the court adds extra fees for removing a warrant. 

 Usually, a person won’t be sent to jail for failure to pay court fees or completing community service.  Most judges will give the person another chance to make good on their promise.  However, if the fines or community service have lagged in the court system for some time, judges have locked up people.  If a person is locked up for failure to pay a court fine, the person will usually get credit for about $30 a day.  Meaning if a person owes a $300 fine, the person would be sitting in jail for 10 days.  So the next time you owe the court a fine or community service, make sure you get it done or else you could end up in jail one day. 

For more information: visit http://www.attorneychan.com or contact me at 508-808-8902

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